Bubbles All Over The World

Sparkling wine, Prosecco, Cava, Champagne and now the English come and invent their „Britagne“ (pronounced “Brit-an-ye“ off course and not like the ending in Champagne). It makes it all even more confusing. So let’s see what actually the difference is between all these sparkling wines and why is Champagne more expensive than the rest.

As a sparkling lover I’m going to explain all differences between the various bubblies. All Champagnes and Sparkling wines come as Extra Brut, Brut (most popular style) Extra Dry, Sec and Demi-Sec depending on their sugar levels. Brut describes a dry natural wine that no sweetness was added to.

Most importantly: anything that is not produced within the French region of Champagne needs to be given another name. In the European Union it is even illegal to call any sparkling “Champagne” when it is not made in this particular region.

But why is Champagne more expensive than other bubblies? The territory of making the wine and the circumstances around the wine making, such as production method or weather are factors that need to be considered.

The method used to produce Champagne is called “the methodé champenoise” and involves a lot of costs, time and labour. Regular wine is put into a bottle and fermented again which produces all these bubbles. After an aging process of at least 15 months the by-products of fermentation (dead yeast cells) must be carefully extracted from the bottle. The pressure inside this bottle is equivalent to that in a car tire. The long storage period and the compound of blends from different years (some may be 8-10 years) also cause additional costs.

The second point is that the Champagne region has relatively cool temperatures that make growing and ripening of wine grapes more difficult. Spring frosts and lack of sunshine mean that some grapes never ripen. So you do not only pay for the grapes that made it into the bottle but also for the ones that didn’t. The process of winemaking itself is expensive and you pay the price. Another problem with this area is it needs to provide countries around the world with its Champagne and although every acre is planted with vines the rarity raises the price.

Italy’s flagship in regards to bubbly is Prosecco made of Italian’s grapes (the Italian wine, region and grape is called Prosecco). It is a fun fruity bubbly, lighter and slightly sweeter than Champagne and the procedure of producing Prosecco differs from the “the methodé champenoise.” Instead the “Charmat” method is used. The wine goes through the second fermentation in pressurised tanks and not in individualised bottles. This tank fermentation preserves the freshness of Prosecco and flavour of the grapes. This procedure is not as complex as for Champagne which allows the lower price.

Since it is a light-bodied, off-dry fizz with slight aromas of peach it is great for making cocktails. Mixed with peach juice Prosecco becomes a Bellini or combined with Aperol and a splash of seltzer it makes a great Aperol Spritz both very popular refreshing drinks in Italy. Two Italian terms describe the type of Prosecco; Spumante is used for fully sparkling wines and Frizzante for lightly sparkling.The name Prosecco can only be applied to sparkling wines that are made of grapes grown in the north-east of Italy. All Prosecco-producing regions are awarded the DOC designation – “Denominazione di origine controllata”, the Italian equivalent of France’s “Appellation d’origine contrôlée” and the first 15 designated regions were elevated to the highest status DOCG.

Winemakers in countries like Austria, Germany, Australia and Brazil that grow Prosecco grape are no longer allowed to call their sparkling wines Prosecco. Instead they will have to use the word “glera” – an alternative name for this grape. Other Italian sparklers are Franciacorta from Lombardy, Asti from Piedmont and Lambrusco from Emilia.

The Spanish Cava resembles Champagne more than the Italian Prosecco. Cava is Spain’s signature sparkling wine mostly made of grapes from the Catalonia hills. Cava is exclusively made of Spanish grapes while the production method used is the same as for Champagne. Cava is softer than Champagne and has aromas of honey, green apple and dried herbs. A good quality Cava will start at a price of €11 which seems a very interesting budget option.

New world countries will surprise you with good sparkling wines as well. Try Australia’s Jacob’s Creek or Wolf Blass which are the ones that rival Champagne the most or go with Cloudy Bay from New Zealand.

Argentina and Chile offer very drinkable sparkling wines for an affordable price. Still relatively new on the world wine market Brazil seems to be on a catch up race and surprises with refreshing and very tasty sparklings such as Aurora Sparkling or Miolo’s Millesime Brut.

Have a look at our range of Champagnes, Proseccos, Cavas and other sparkling wines at www.WinesMadeEasy.ie

© Copyright Wines Made Easy – Wine Blog - Designed by Pexeto